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3 Types of Court Reporting Services

Cincinnati Court reporting

When most people think of court reporting services, they think of the court reporters who work in the courts. While many do in fact work within court rooms, that isn’t the only position they can fill, and many people don’t realize just how versatile court reporters are. In actuality, over 70% of the more than 50,000 court reporters in the United States work outside of the courts. Read on to see the other positions court reporters may fill.

In the Courts
This is what most people see of the court reporting profession. These professionals transcribe what happens within a court room during a trial, and must be able to type everything said with 95% accuracy. This transcript then goes into a database in order to be studied for later cases, in addition to being a clear document of the proceedings.

Specific Attorneys and Firms
Court reporters may also choose to apply for a position with a specific attorney or law firm. If they choose this route, they may be responsible for doing research, transcribing, or translating any documents needed for a case.

Court Reporting Agency
In the United States, there are three national court reporting agencies: The National Court Reporters Association (NCRA), the National Verbatim Reporters Association (NVRA) and the American Association of Electronic Reporters and Transcribers (AAERT). These agencies are responsible for approving of reporters once they finish their schooling, as well as regulating the court reporters around the nation. Someone who is trained as a reporter may choose to work for one of these agencies rather than going to the courts.

Employment for court reporting services is expected to grow by about 10% between 2012 and 2022, so it is a favorable profession to get into right now. Have you ever considered it? Did you realize how many different things a court reporter can do with their training?

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